Dabbit Dodo

Lolz, remember when this used to be a baking blog? Well it kinda still is. Seriously. Look on the top of the page. See? Mud OR Chocolate. Sometimes both. Sometimes it’s an entirely different brown substance that I’d really rather not talk about, but there is a not-yet-potty-trained toddler in the house so… yeah.

Speaking of toddlers, you probably have no idea what the title of this post is, because it is written in toddler-ese, in the dialect of X. It translates roughly to carrot doughnut. He learned the about dodos from my sister. She has a slight addiction to Dunkin’ Donuts coffee products. That, paired with a slight addiction to pumping her nephew full of sugar to see what he’ll do while riding the sucrose wave, gave my son the ability to recognize the Dunkin’ Donuts sign from 3 miles away. Fab.

Dabbits, or carrots, are a completely new word, because the last time X ate a carrot, it was pureed in a jar and he wasn’t anywhere near speaking yet. It’s not that we haven’t tried to give him carrots. He just can’t eat them. He tries. He’ll shove them in his mouth, but then spit it back out because carrots (unless cooked to mush) are relatively hard for someone just mastering molars. So, even though X happily ate veggies as a baby, he has taken the turn that most toddlers do to not touch a vegetable unless it is hidden in something.

Coincidentally, I was a bored to tears at work one day and putzing around on websites that I hadn’t been on forever and stumbled on the Daring Kitchen. I haven’t participated in a challenge since April 2011, but why the heck not take a peek at what the challenge would be for this month. It couldn’t have been more perfect:

Ruth from Makey-Cakey was our March 2013 Daring Bakers’ challenge host. She encouraged us all to get experimental in the kitchen and sneak some hidden veggies into our baking, with surprising and delicious results!

A further sign from the gods that I should do the challenge this month, was that, for some reason, I had a giant bunch of carrots sitting in the fridge that was about to start looking not-so-much like carrots anymore. I had planned to just juice them, but kept being super-lazy when it came to actually taking out the juicer, using it, and the cleaning it. This challenge gave me just the push that I needed to stop being a scrub.

I started out by doing the good parent thing and having X help me to prepare the carrots. Allegedly, if the kid helps make the food, they are more likely to eat the food. Sure, I’ll try. He handed me carrots and I peeled them.

It took a while, because with each carrot, we had this conversation:

X: What’s this?

Me: That is a carrot.

X: Dabbit?

Me: Yes, a carrot.

X: I eat. (takes a bite)

Me: Is that yummy?

X: Nummy! (spits bite out into bowl of freshly peeled carrots)

peeled carrots

Re-rinsed carrots to eliminate the pre-chewed ones

Then I pulled out the juicer and juiced the carrots. With another interrogation from X about what I was doing as I put each carrot into the vortex of veggie doom.

carrot juice and pulp

All those carrots = 1.5 cups? of juice and a bunch of dry, nasty carrot pulp.

All X heard from my explanation was ‘juice’ so he asked for some juice. I hesitantly poured him some of the carrot juice into his big boy cup, imagining another spitting incident.

carrot juice

But there was no spitting. He loved it! I even had to pour him more! Maybe there is something to this whole helping thing!?

Armed with my carrot juice and pulp, I adapted a baked doughnut recipe from King Arthur Flour to make Carrot Doughnuts, or Dabbit Dodos.

Carrot Doughnuts

  • 7/8 cup King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons carrot pulp*
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 tablespoons safflower oil
  • 1/4 cup carrot juice*

*I kind of eye-balled these until the batter looked and tasted sufficiently carrot-y

  1. Whisk together all of the dry ingredients in a medium-sized mixing bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat the eggs, oil and water until foamy.
  3. Pour the liquid ingredients all at once into the dry ingredients and stir just until combined.
  4. Butter or grease the doughnut pan (I used my precious Pam for Baking.) Fill each doughnut form half full.
  5. Bake the doughnuts in a preheated 375°F oven for 10 to 12 minutes. When done, they’ll spring back when touched lightly, and will be quite brown on the top.
  6. Remove the doughnuts from the oven, remove them from the pan, and allow them to cool on rack.

donutsI made a quick glaze by mixing a small pile of powdered sugar and enough carrot juice to make it into a glaze to to dip the doughnuts in. Sorry for the lackadaisical recipe here, but that’s just how I make glaze.

glazed

I’ll advise to dunk the top of the donuts (as in the part not in contact with the pan.) I dunked the bottom, more porous, side, so all the glaze ended up being absorbed by the doughnut.

Now, there is barely any carrot in here in relation to the amount of doughnutty goodness, so I am not going to claim that these are some super-healthy-veggie-doughnuts. I am going to say, that X loved them! And another kid (10 years old?) that came over loved them. And it got X at least interested in the concept of a carrot.

carrot eater

I’ll call that a WIN

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8 thoughts on “Dabbit Dodo

  1. I LOVE this! I always have leftover pulp from juicing so this is really helpful! Carrot juice is delicious when it’s fresh.. no wonder he liked it! I bet he’d love it even more if you added a few apples to it! 🙂

  2. Definitely a win! Glad your kitchen helper is one step closer to liking carrots 🙂 These small steps feel like big victories sometimes! Thanks so much for taking part this month Rx

  3. Haha, I love toddler-ese! Adding veggies into muffins is a great way to get extra nutrients into toddlers who sometimes don’t want to eat anything. Your carrot donuts look delicious! Great idea to use the juice/pulp instead of just shredding them!

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